trimming cats nails
Your cat is probably your best friend, but what about those razor sharp claws that attack your toes in the middle of the night? Does he feel like a friend then? Of course! Nothing will change your love for your cat.
However, most indoor cats need help keeping their nails trimmed. If you possess the courage to take on this task, there are a few things you should know before you start. Read on to learn how to cut cat nails without a scratch.

Know How to Use the Clippers

Both you and your cat should feel comfortable with the sound of the clippers long before you start trimming his nails. Gather the clippers, some treats, and a cooked noodle. Have your cat sit on your lap and massage one of his toe pads until a nail pops out. Next, use the clippers to cut the noodle and then give your cat a treat. Repeat this a few times during a few different sittings to make sure you cat gets used to the sound and movement of the clippers.

Set the Right Time and Place

cat getting nails clipped
It's easiest to start trimming your cat's nails when he is still a kitten, but this isn't always the case. You may have adopted your cat already grown or have just decided to start clipping his nails. Either way, it's important to choose a quiet area where your cat can rest on your lap. The sleepier your cat is, the easier it will be to clip his nails. Make sure there is nothing that can distract him during nail cutting time, like other pets, loud noises, or birds flying by the window.
To start, gently massage your cat's paws, but not for too long or he'll see this as an invitation to play. After massaging each paw for about three seconds, you can begin clipping his nails.

Never Cut Down to the Quick

When it comes time to cut your cat's nails you will need to avoid the pink area. This is where the blood vessels and nerves are. You only want to cut the white part of the nail to avoid pain and injury to your cat. However, if you accidentally cut down to the quick, you can stop the bleeding using a styptic power or stick. Keep these items on hand before you start trimming your cat's nails.

What Not to Do When Trimming Your Cat's Nails

cat getting a pedicure
Chances are, your cat may resist the trimming. If he does, don't yell or punish him. Instead, stop what you are doing and try again another time. Also, you don't have to trim all of your cat's nails in one sitting. Instead, trim three or four at a time to really get your cat used to the cutters and the action they take. Be sure to always have treats nearby to positively reinforce nail-trimming.
Your cat will typically need a nail clipping every ten days to two weeks depending on whether you cat is an indoor or outdoor cat and how quickly his nails grow back. Some cats will easily let you trim their nails, while others will not. If you have a cat that simply will not sit through a nail-trimming session, it is best to bring your cat to a professional groomer or veterinarian for regular nail trimming.
Do you regularly trim your cats nails? If so, we would love to hear more about the tips and tricks you use to get the job done. Tell us more about your cat and your nail-trimming tips in the comments below.

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When considering how finicky cats can be, even about their kitty litter, you want to find the best cat litter brands on the market today for your frisky feline. Your cat deserves the best. You know this. Your cat certainly knows this, and he’ll know if you switch to a better cat litter. So, what should you look for when purchasing cat litter? Read on to find out how to choose to the best cat litter brand.

How to Find the Best Cat Litter Brands

Cats are clean animals. They keep themselves clean by giving themselves a bath, and they expect their cat litter box to be clean - all the time. Otherwise, you might end up with a surprise on your floor - or worse - your pillow.
When looking for the best cat litter brands, your cat only wants the best. This means you should have some criteria in the back of your mind when choosing a cat litter brand, such as, how absorbent the cat litter is. The better it absorbs, the less moisture will remain behind, meaning you won't need to change the cat litter as often. This makes life easier for you and your cat.
The absorption also drastically reduces awful smells that both you and your cat hate. When choosing the best cat litter, keep this in mind, especially if you and your cat live in a small space.

How the Right Cat Litter Makes all the Difference

two cat litters
Have you ever really LOOKED at the cat litter box after your cat goes tinkle? Probably not. Why would you, right?
The reason to look is to inspect your cat's litter box once in a while in order to ascertain whether or not your cat is having health problems. He may appear to be healthy, but what's left behind in a cat litter box doesn't lie. With PrettyLitter, your cat's litter will change a different color if he is experiencing a health issue.
Since he can't talk and tell you what's going on inside of him, PrettyLitter does it for you and this certainly makes all the difference. If your cat's litter changes color, you'll know for certain something is wrong, and you can get your cat to the vet's office right away before the problem becomes worse.

The Bottom Line

When you use the Pretty Litter subscription based cat litter service, expect a small four-pound bag of cat litter to last you an entire month. It doesn't clump like most brands on the market. Instead, it is so absorbent that you won't need to keep replacing your cat's litter week after week. If your cat has a health problem, it won't go unnoticed when you use this brand of cat litter.
What cat litter are you currently using? Does your cat love it? Do you love it? If not, it's time to make the switch to the world's best cat litter. Let us know in the comments if you've been using PrettyLitter cat litter and how it has worked out for you and your cat, and if you use another cat litter but are ready to make the switch, tell us why. We would love to hear from you!

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cat sitting in litter box

Cat litter is the magical substance that makes life easier for owners around the world. It’s not all that much to look at, but its powers are impressive. If you’ve always wondered what makes cat litter super-absorbent, you’ve come to the right place.

We’ve broken down the subject of cat litter for you, so, the next time you’re emptying your cat litter box, you’ll have a greater understanding of what you’re dealing with.

The Origin of Cat Litter

The idea of a substance designed to soak up cat urine is nothing new. During the early 20th century, people used everything from ash to sand to address the problem, with varying degrees of success, but cats aren’t all that enamored with these particularly harsh substances, and both have a tendency to stick to feet and fur, which causes cleaning headaches around the home.
During the 1940s, Edward Lowe discovered that granulated clay absorbed moisture and trapped bad odors, but crucially, cats didn’t track the clay through the house afterwards. Lowe recommended the solution to his friends, and the feedback he received was universally positive.
Lowe spotted a business opportunity. He filled five-pound bags with his granulated clay, and branded it “kitty litter.” This relatively simple solution to an age-old problem was an instant hit, and made Lowe rich beyond his wildest dreams.

What’s in Modern Day Cat Litter?

clay cat litter
Lowe’s granulated clay solution remained unchanged for around 40 years, but cat litter became yet more effective — and cheaper — when Thomas Nelson noticed that bentonite clay forms clumps when wet.
This new “clumping cat litter” brought down the cost of pet care. Owners were able to simply remove the clumps instead of replacing the entire cat litter box.
The main component of most modern cat litters is still clay. However, mining bentonite clay is relatively expensive. Cheaper clays often contain added silica, which delivers the all-important clumping quality.
The most expensive options on the market today are usually those made with silica gel. Each silica gel pearl contains a maze of tunnels. When the cat pees on it, the internal structures of the pearl trap the moisture, along with the smell. The moisture eventually evaporates, leaving the odor sealed away. You can use most silica gels for up to a month at a time.

Eco-Friendly Cat Litter

Mining clay leaves a significant carbon footprint behind, and it can also ravage areas of natural beauty. There are also concerns about the safety of silica cat litters, as they can be harmful to dogs and other pets when ingested in large quantities.
A range of natural and eco-friendly cat litters are now available, and many of them address environmental and health concerns. Renewable products such as wheat, sawdust, corncobs and peanut shells are being used to create highly effective cat litter. The absorbency and clumping of clay is replicated with the use of binding products such as starch.

Odor Control

silica gel cat litter
Clay, silica and the other materials used to make cat litter have natural odor-absorbing qualities, but as manufacturers continue to develop their products, new and more effective agents are being developed all the time.
Carbon and baking soda both trap bad smells before they can develop, so they're used a lot in commercial cat litters.
Other natural odor-absorbents include cedar and pine, which are added to litter in the form of chippings. There are also added fragrance options that mask odors, but as we know, not all cats will tolerate the likes of lavender and vanilla in their toilet.
The world’s best cat litter brands keep homes clean and smelling fresh with the minimum of effort. Yes, clay is still a popular cat litter ingredient, but there are other options out there. Try a few solutions, and choose something you and your cat can both agree on.

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cat in crystal litter

If you’ve been wondering what cat litter crystals are, you’re not alone. Many people puzzle over the best cat litter to buy for their feline companions, and often that’s because they just don’t have all the facts. Are cat litter crystals safe? Are cat litter crystals better than clay-based litter? What about wood-based litter? Let’s answer some of those questions today.

Cat Litter Crystals: The Tidy Option

Clay based litter clumps, dries, then produces grey dust. Your kitty picks up clay dust on their paws and treads it all around your lovely, clean home. Pine cat litter is in pellets which cats tend to burrow in and kick all over. Then when moist, it turns into a weird mush that can be tricky to scoop and clean. Cat litter crystals are winning in the clean charts, because they don’t clump, which makes it easier to scoop out the solids. The crystals actually absorb and eliminate odor, so the tray doesn’t need to be emptied as often, reducing your daily chore list! Crystal litter produces less dust, keeping your home cleaner and tidier.

Cat Litter Crystals: The Safer Option

crystal litter with scooper

The additional benefit of crystal litter producing less dust is that it’s kinder to people with allergies. It can also even prevent cats developing asthma, and is certainly easier on the lungs of those animals who already have asthma.

Clay-based cat litter has special chemicals added which cause the clay to clump when it comes into contact with your cat’s urine. This is supposed to make it easier to scoop, but those chemicals can actually be harmful to your cat. This is because your cat licks their paws after a visit to the tray, and the clay dust they lick off can expand in their tummies and intestines. Crystal cat litter is entirely non-toxic and has no such clumping or expanding chemicals. Your cat is at no risk from licking cat litter crystals, which gives you peace of mind as a responsible pet owner.

Cat litter crystals are also super light, because their made of silica gel. This means it’s safer for your back and knees too!

Cat Litter Crystals: The Greener Option

crystal cat litter

It’s so important we look after our environment. Cat litter is one of those unavoidable consumables that we need to keep our kitties clean and healthy. But do we need to be changing the cat litter every few days? With clay-based litter which clumps, you might find you need to empty and refill the tray at least this often. Pine cat litter might last a bit longer before needing to be changed, and because it’s sourced from by-products of the wood industry, it’s possibly a greener option than clay cat litter, but cat litter crystals win this round too.

A good crystal-based cat litter only needs to be fully changed around once a month. This means a lower carbon footprint, as it’s less trips to the grocery store or less deliveries if you’re on a subscription service like PrettyLitter. Because less cat litter is used, less energy is used in the production of cat litter, which is also great for the environment.

Cat litter crystals could be the future of cat litter; cleaner, greener and better for your cat. Give us your views in the comments!

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cat digging in litter box

You’ve just cleaned the litterbox. It’s all nice and fresh, and if you’ve got a quality crystal based cat litter, you shouldn’t need to clean it fully for several weeks. Your cat decides they need to use it right now, of course. They daintily do their business and… oh no! They’re kicking like mad, sending cat litter flying all over the floor. All your hard work, ruined. Well, it’s not just you or your cat. This is a really common thing that cats do. But why? And what can you do about it?

Why is my cat kicking their cat litter everywhere?

Your cat might look like their kicking cat litter joyfully, just to make more hard work for you, but actually, they’re digging. This is because they have a natural instinct to cover their poop and pee. Cats are very clean creatures, and this ties somewhat into that, but there’s a more primal reason too. Cat feces and urine contain pheromones, which cats use to mark their territory. In the wild, smaller cats would bury their feces to indicate that they acknowledged the dominance of larger predators. When your cat is trying to bury their poop, they are saying, “You’re the boss human, and I know it.” So annoying as it may be, take it as a compliment!

Does the type of litterbox make a difference?

cat getting out of the litter box

It can. If the litterbox is too small, your cat may be uncomfortable and turn around and around looking for a good spot to go in. A small litterbox also means that when the cat does dig, there’s nowhere for the cat litter to go except on the floor. It also helps if the litter box has high sides, as these will catch some of the cat litter that is thrown around.

One answer to the problem is to get a litterbox with a hood, which is like a separate room for your cat to go in. Whatever litterbox type you use, always make sure you use the right amount of cat litter. Too much, and you eliminate the benefits of a box with higher sides. Too little, and your cat doesn’t have enough to absorb their urine or cover their solids.

 

What else can I do to keep the cat litter in the litterbox?

Remove solids as soon as you see them, as cats will paw around the tray looking for a clean spot to use, which might mean additional digging and more cat litter on the floor. For clay based or wood based litter, you’ll also need to scoop the urine soaked litter out regularly. Cats might keep digging if they can smell their ‘business’ because they don’t feel they have hidden it enough. This is why it can be really helpful to buy a cat litter that fights odor. By using an odor free cat litter, you’re actually helping your cat mask the smell of their own waste, which reduces their instinct to keep burying it. Silica Gel based litter such as PrettyLitter can be beneficial, as it absorbs then eliminates odors.

Some cats are just more into digging than others, but with our tips, you might be able to encourage them to keep a bit more cat litter in the litter box, rather than all over your floor. Have you got a cat that digs and kicks cat litter? How do you deal with it? Let us know in the comments!

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Cat At Vet
Cat neutering is something millions of loving pet-owners prepare themselves for every year. No one likes the thought of their beloved cat going through a painful and uncomfortable medical procedure. Many people dread the procedure, but the reality is actually quick and straightforward.
Whether you’re thinking about getting your cat neutered or you’re nervous about an impending procedure, there are a few things you should know.

Why Should I Consider Neutering My Cat?

The most obvious reason to neuter a cat is to avoid unwanted pregnancies. But there are a few health benefits too. For example, neutered cats have a reduced risk of contracting contagious diseases. They are also less likely to develop certain cancers later in life.
Unneutered cats tend to be more aggressive and territorial. This means they’re involved in regular confrontations and fights — and it a higher risk of injury.
Male cats attract mates by spraying particularly smelly urine, sometimes in the home. Neutering stops the urge to reproduce, so the constant spraying stops immediately.

Preparing for Cat Neutering

Cat Getting Check up
Book an appointment with a vet to discuss the procedure. You will learn more about what lies ahead at this initial meeting. Some vets bring the cat in for initial checks at this appointment. There is a chance you’ll need to keep your cat indoors the night before the operation. And you may have to withdraw food and water several hours before the procedure is due to begin.

The Cat Neutering Operation

The operation itself is usually very straightforward. It’s worth remembering that vets do this procedure several times a week, so don’t worry unduly. The latest anesthetics and pain-relief ensure everything is pretty painless during surgery.
In the case of females, the vet makes a small incision just below the belly button. The vet removes the uterus and both ovaries via this opening — making reproduction impossible. The entire procedure typically takes 30 minutes, but it may take longer if the cat is in heat.
The vet makes an incision in the scrotum of male cats, and the testicles are completely removed. This is a far simpler procedure than the one employed for females, and is often completed within two or three minutes.

What to Expect After the Operation

Cat in Cone
Most cats come around from the anesthetic within half an hour of surgery — and are free to return home the same day. The vet may administer a few pain-relief injections for a few days afterward, but not always.
Most cats want a little alone time immediately after a neutering operation. It’s best to leave them in peace… they come to their owners when they’re ready. Expect a little more aggression for a day or two after the procedure. The whole process is disorienting and frightening, and a cat’s natural response to such emotions is often to act aggressively.
Check your cat’s wound once a day. A little swelling and discharge is normal but speak to your vet if these issues become severe or worsen suddenly. Both side-effects should subside around three days after the procedure. If your cat is biting or licking its scar, your vet might fit an Elizabethan collar.
For a cat, the neutering process is often disorienting and painful. But as someone who loves their cat very much, you might find the whole experience a little distressing. Just keep in mind that you’re putting your cat through all of this for all the right reasons.

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Cat with Big eyes
Catnip is a very special plant to many cats. While it comes from a perennial herb in the mint family, to cats it is like the equivalent of a hallucinogenic , and no, we have no idea how this was gauged. Here is all you need to know about cats and catnip.

What is Catnip?

CatNip
As mentioned, catnip is an herb that comes from the mint family. There is a chemical compound found in the stems and leaves called nepetalactone, which acts as a stimulant.
The blooms on the stems of catnip are a gorgeous lavender, white, blue, or pink - but that's not what your kitty is after. 
Many people grown their own catnip and it's fairly easy to do. Use the seedling or seeds and plant after the last freeze of the season. They like full sunlight and soil that is porous. Give them plenty of room to grow, hang the cuttings in a cool, dark place (upside down), and store the dried leaves for future use.

How Does It Work?

Only about half of cats are susceptible to the euphoria caused by catnip. It is considered to be similar to how we react to hallucinogens. The difference in catnip and some hallucinogenic drugs in humans is that catnip is not harmful at all.
The effects last about 15 minutes, which could cause susceptible kitties to pawn their belongings to get more. But seriously, catnip is actually non-addictive. Your cat may (or may not) love the feeling it gets from a bit of catnip.
According to Healthy Pet:
Catnip makes some cats aggressive rather than happily euphoric or pleasantly relaxed. If you have a multi-cat household, I recommend you introduce catnip to each cat individually to avoid any potential for fighting.
If the catnip is ingested, it simply causes fatigue and works as a sedative. For cats that sniff catnip and rub against the plants - those are the ones who get the stimulating effects.

Why Do Some Cats React and Some Do Not?

Cat Eating CatNip
According to PetMD:
About 50 percent of cats seem to be affected by catnip, and the behavior that results varies widely between individuals, and it is believed to be an inherited sensitivity.
Other statistics state up to 75 percent are affected but basically, it's a decently large number - at least half.
If you do have a cat that has inherited this passion for the plant, it doesn't show up immediately. Instead, it will take quite a few months since young kittens are not affected.
One of the interesting aspects is that long-term exposure renders the effects...well, non-effective. The euphoria that your cat gets from catnip does wear off the more they use it.

Catnip for Human Consumption?

It's true. Humans have used catnip for centuries - mostly for its sedative effects when brewed in a tea or infusion. It helps with nausea, toothaches, and headaches although pregnant women should stay away from the nip. Some health food stores even sell capsules that are used to treat digestive issues and headaches.
Other uses for humans include wound care by crushing the catnip leaves, wetting them, and making a paste for the wound.
Do you have a cat that loves catnip or does your cat totally ignore it? Let us know in the comments.

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Cat in Cat Litter

From tracking their grainy sand through your hallway to clearing out a whole room due to smelly litter, cat parents often find themselves struggling to manage their kitty’s box while still keeping a healthy and welcoming home.

It Kitty Litter Making You Bitter?

Perhaps one of the most irritating parts of owning a cat is having to run to the store every time you’re short on litter. To make it worth your while, you generally have to purchase bags weighing 20 pounds or more, and even then it’s a pain to tote it from the store, to your car, and into your home.

Storing the litter and trying to avoid leaks and rips in the bag make even more of a mess, as if you're kitty doesn't kick enough onto the floor as it is. Not only is that wasteful, but it's also uncomfortable to step on and definitely not fun to look at. Your shoes and your cat's paws will undoubtedly track it all over the room, which means you have to sweep it up frequently.

Let’s not even talk about the smell that wafts out the door and is the first thing to greet your guests’ noses every time they come over for a visit. These are the things that can make even the biggest cat lover question, “Why aren’t they potty trained again?”

Skip The Hassle With PrettyLitter

PrettyLitter

After recognizing all the problems cat owners are facing, PrettyLitter decided to step up to the plate.

For years, you have done things the old way, lugging bags of litter into your home, scooping and sweeping every day, and constantly battling the smell of your cat litter box with sprays and fresheners trying to mask the terrible scent.

When you subscribe to PrettyLitter, you can finally say goodbye to these problems.

#1 No More Lugging

PrettyLitter is a subscription service that brings perfectly sized bags of litter directly to your door. You don’t even have to worry about storing an oversized bag either, because just a 4-pound bag of Pretty Litter will last your cat an entire month!

#2 No More Mess

Tired of scooping and spilling all over the floor? With PrettyLitter, you simply pour the 4-pound bag into your cat’s box and it will last for a full 30 days.

A traditional litter will turn urine spots into large and heavy clumps that have to be scooped out and disposed of. The litter that clumped up must be replaced periodically, typically on a daily basis. That means more litter, bigger bags of litter, and more trips to the store.

With PrettyLitter, just dispose of the feces. When it’s time to change, a new bag will arrive at your door. All you have to do is dump and refill.

#3 No More Odor

PrettyLitter is different than other litters because it absorbs and eliminates moisture, allowing one fill to last the whole month without the smell.

Our special litter is made using a super absorbent, lightweight silica gel. The crystals are extremely absorbent and that means you need to do less of the same compared to other litter substrates.

#4 Keep Tabs on Your Tabby’s Health

PrettyLitter even helps you stay on top of your cat’s health because it changes color based on what is absorbed.

Blue or green means high alkaline was detected in your cat’s urine, orange means high acidity was detected, and deep maroon means blood is present. That means a quick glance at your cat’s box can help you check-in on their health.

That’s right, it’s pretty much the world’s best kitty litter!

See The PrettyLitter Difference

Give PrettyLitter a try for yourself. It’ll save you time and it’ll help you cut down on wasteful scooping and messy odors so that you can devote more of your day to scratches and playtime.

What’s your biggest problem with traditional kitty litter? Let us know in the comments below.

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Scooping Litter

Cat litter, like everything else in modern life, has evolved over time. In the past, pet owners filled litter boxes with everything from sand to ashes, which got the basic job done but didn't do much about smells or make the box particularly easy to clean. These substances gave way to modern clay cat litter products -- but even in this day and age, you still have to choose between clumping and non-clumping cat litter. Let's take a look at each of these options to see which of them might prove the smartest choice for your kitty's comfort, health, and preferences.

Non-Clumping Cat Litter: The Original Choice

Cat with Cat Litters
Non-clumping litter, also called absorbing cat litter, served as the one and only commercial option for most cat owners for many years, starting in the 1940s. Some non-clumping litter is made from organic materials such as pine or wood, but most of it consists of a form of clay called bentonite. The clay does a good job of absorbing both odors and urine -- although once the litter becomes saturated, you may end up with a puddle of it at the bottom of the litter box. Be prepared to change non-clumping litter frequently.
Cats often like non-clumping litter because it behaves more like the dirt they would walk on in the wild. Owners often like it because it produces relatively little dust.

Clumping Cat Litter: Efficiency and Convenience

Clumping cat litter came along in the 1980s, leading to the use of silica gels that would react to moisture by binding to it. The great selling point of clumping cat litter is the ease and efficiency with which a cat owner can clean the litter box. A few scoops of of the clumped-together material leaves the unused litter clean, dry, odorless, and ready for future use, with no need to change the entire litter supply or clean pooled urine out of the bottom of the box.
The downside of clumping litter is that it tends to kick up more dust than the non-clumping variety, and it can take on a sticky consistency that your cat may not like. It also costs more, although this disadvantage might be offset a little by the fact that you're throwing away less litter with each cleaning.

Health Considerations

Two Types Of Cat Litter
Does your cat have a respiratory issue such as asthma? If so, you want to use the least dusty cat litter you can get your hands on. This usually means going with non-clumping cat litter instead of clumping cat litter. Generally speaking, the smaller the particles, the better the clumping action -- and the dustier the litter. Non-clumping cat litter usually has larger particles, thus resulting in fewer clouds of dust to disturb your cat's airways (and possibly yours as well).

Fine-Tuning Your Options

Even today's non-clumping cat litter isn't always made of clay. You can still get products made of pine, for instance; they may smell better to you than they do to your cat, but at least they produce minimal dust. Recycled corn, wheat, and even newspaper can can make good cat litter; just make sure that your cat doesn't have an allergy to any of these substances beforehand if at all possible. Whatever you do, make certain the litter you choose doesn't contain crystalline silica quartz, since this substance can cause cancer.

Of course, it's your cat's preferences that will really seal the deal. Try a few types of non-clumping and clumping litter to discover which one your kitty seems to like best. A happy cat means a happy home -- and a happy litter box is a great place to start!

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Whether you've just adopted a new cat, brought home a newborn kitten, or are training an outside cat to live indoors, it is important to each your feline friend use the restroom in the correct spot. Cat litter box training can make cleaning up after your cat a breeze if done properly. These helpful hints will make training your cat to use the litter box easier than ever and help you get over any hurdles or challenges along the way.

Top 5 Tips for Easier Cat Litter Box

1. Talk to your veterinarian.

Abnormal litter box habits can mean trouble for your cat! If your new cat is having too many accidents out of the box, it may be time to visit the vet and see about other issues. Choosing a premium cat litter such as PrettyLitter may also alert you to any other health concerns with your cat's bathroom habits. Unique color-changing technology helps you see any abnormalities in your cat's normal routine. Track signs of infection and kidney problems before every visiting the vet with this revolutionary formula.

2. Keep the box separate from food or water.

Would you want to eat your dinner in the same place where you go to the bathroom? Cats are naturally clean animals and will not want to use the litter box if it is placed where they eat. Make sure that the litter box for your cat is set in an area that is separate from where your cat likes to enjoy his or her meals.

3. Use premium kitty litter.

Choosing the right litter for your cat cannot only make litter box training much easier, but the right litter can also lead to surprising benefits. Your cat will not want to use its litter box if it is not kept clean so choose a litter that is clumping or absorbent to make mess less extreme. Extra odor control technology can keep your house smelling fresh and clean. A clean litter box will make for a happy cat that is less likely to have accidents outside of its box.

4. Try different boxes.

If your cat is still having accidents outside of the box, even after you have visited the veterinarian or switched to a premium kitty litter, it may be time to look at the litter box you are using. Some cats may prefer covered boxes to uncovered boxes. A covered box might give your cat more privacy and make it feel more comfortable. Hooded litter boxes when paired with a premium kitty litter can provide maximum odor protection.

5. Clean up after accidents quickly.

If your cat is going outside of the box due to spraying, be sure to clean accidents quickly. This will help prevent them from making a habit of marking the same spot. Spraying is a common behavior of cats when they visit new environments because they are trying to mark their territories. With some training, your cat should feel more comfortable in its new home and ready to choose the litter box instead of other areas.

Teaching your cat to properly use the litter box is a key part of feline ownership. By choosing the best kitty litter for your cat and following the tips in this helpful guide, your feline companion should be a litter box pro in no time. Do you have any tips for cat owners when it comes to litter box training? Which of these helpful tips worked the best for you and your cat? We would love to hear you best litter box tips and tricks in the comments below.

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