Five Amazing Facts about Ragamuffin Cats

Ragamuffin Cat

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You’ve probably heard of Ragdoll cats, but how much do you know about their descendants, Ragamuffin cats? This cute name truly suits these soft-furred and friendly felines, who are a relatively new breed having only appeared on the scene in the 1990s. Here’s a rundown of our favorite facts about Ragamuffin cats, so you can top up on your cat fancy knowledge!

Ragamuffin Cats Are a Ragdoll Crossbreed

Ragdoll cats have been around since the 1960s and are well known for being super friendly, with fluffy medium length fur and striking blue eyes. When bred with Persian cats, Himalayan cats and others, the result is often a Ragamuffin. Ragamuffins retain the Ragdoll’s tame and sweet personality but don’t normally have blue eyes, and their fur is soft and feels almost like rabbit fur.

Ragamuffin Cats are Rebels

ragamuffin

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Well, their original breeders were, at least. They were members of the International Ragdoll Cat Association (IRCA) and were becoming increasingly exasperated with how restrictive the rules were on breeding Ragdoll cats. They broke away from the IRCA in 1994 to breed their own version of the Ragdoll, and thus the Ragamuffin was born.

Ragamuffin Wasn’t the First Choice of Name

The name that was originally going to be used for these fluffy felines was Liebling, the German word for ‘darling’ or ‘sweetheart.’ So, the Ragamuffin cats could have ended up being Sweetheart cats; how appropriate! The name Ragamuffin was chosen to keep a link from the new breed to the foundation breed, the Ragdoll. To this day, one of the original Ragamuffin breeders has a cattery in North Virginia called Liebling Cats.

Ragamuffins Love to be Held

Ragamuffin Kitten

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Ragdolls are so named because they go limp like a soft toy when picked up, and Ragamuffins do exactly the same. This is because Ragamuffin cats are unusually relaxed about being held, and love to curl up on their humans for some quality cuddling. You can scoop up a Ragamuffin and hold them like a baby, although of course double check with the owner if it’s not your cat; not all cats are as docile as each other! Because of their love of human interaction, they can become depressed and withdrawn if left alone for hours every day, so consider your routine if you’re thinking about becoming a Ragamuffin owner.

Ragamuffins are Easy to Care For

Despite their long, luxurious fur, Ragamuffin cats don’t actually need all that much grooming. With most longhairs, you need to put a good portion of time aside every few days for a lengthy brushing session. Ragamuffins have an unusual texture to their fur which makes it tangle resistant, so a gentle, short brushing session once a week is usually more than sufficient to prevent matting. As with all cats, they need their ears cleaning gently if they become dirty, and a spotless litter tray to keep them happy and healthy for many years to come.

Ragamuffin cats are better suited to being indoor cats, mostly because they don’t really have a sense of fear! They are full of confidence, which unfortunately can get them into trouble when out and about. Their natural curiosity can lead them into places they might not be able to get out of, like a neighbor’s garage or outhouse.

Now you know about Ragamuffin cats, what do you think about having one as a pet? Or maybe you already have a Ragamuffin and know some more interesting facts about this fairly new, yet fascinating breed. Let us know in the comments!




Christine Whitt
Christine Whitt

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