A Brief Guide to Cat Neutering

Cat At Vet
Cat neutering is something millions of loving pet-owners prepare themselves for every year. No one likes the thought of their beloved cat going through a painful and uncomfortable medical procedure. Many people dread the procedure, but the reality is actually quick and straightforward.
Whether you’re thinking about getting your cat neutered or you’re nervous about an impending procedure, there are a few things you should know.

Why Should I Consider Neutering My Cat?

The most obvious reason to neuter a cat is to avoid unwanted pregnancies. But there are a few health benefits too. For example, neutered cats have a reduced risk of contracting contagious diseases. They are also less likely to develop certain cancers later in life.
Unneutered cats tend to be more aggressive and territorial. This means they’re involved in regular confrontations and fights — and it a higher risk of injury.
Male cats attract mates by spraying particularly smelly urine, sometimes in the home. Neutering stops the urge to reproduce, so the constant spraying stops immediately.

Preparing for Cat Neutering

Cat Getting Check up
Book an appointment with a vet to discuss the procedure. You will learn more about what lies ahead at this initial meeting. Some vets bring the cat in for initial checks at this appointment. There is a chance you’ll need to keep your cat indoors the night before the operation. And you may have to withdraw food and water several hours before the procedure is due to begin.

The Cat Neutering Operation

The operation itself is usually very straightforward. It’s worth remembering that vets do this procedure several times a week, so don’t worry unduly. The latest anesthetics and pain-relief ensure everything is pretty painless during surgery.
In the case of females, the vet makes a small incision just below the belly button. The vet removes the uterus and both ovaries via this opening — making reproduction impossible. The entire procedure typically takes 30 minutes, but it may take longer if the cat is in heat.
The vet makes an incision in the scrotum of male cats, and the testicles are completely removed. This is a far simpler procedure than the one employed for females, and is often completed within two or three minutes.

What to Expect After the Operation

Cat in Cone
Most cats come around from the anesthetic within half an hour of surgery — and are free to return home the same day. The vet may administer a few pain-relief injections for a few days afterward, but not always.
Most cats want a little alone time immediately after a neutering operation. It’s best to leave them in peace… they come to their owners when they’re ready. Expect a little more aggression for a day or two after the procedure. The whole process is disorienting and frightening, and a cat’s natural response to such emotions is often to act aggressively.
Check your cat’s wound once a day. A little swelling and discharge is normal but speak to your vet if these issues become severe or worsen suddenly. Both side-effects should subside around three days after the procedure. If your cat is biting or licking its scar, your vet might fit an Elizabethan collar.
For a cat, the neutering process is often disorienting and painful. But as someone who loves their cat very much, you might find the whole experience a little distressing. Just keep in mind that you’re putting your cat through all of this for all the right reasons.



Christine Whitt
Christine Whitt

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